MOVERS IN SWAMPSCOTT | STAIRHOPPER MOVERS

How to Tell the Children that You’re Moving

Moving can be challenging, especially with children. There are many factors to consider when relocating with your family. Are your children going to settle in well?  Will they be devastated if you move them away from their comfort zone? This article will help people looking for movers in Swampscott break the news to their children and make moving a pleasant experience.

The Fear of Change

Many parents fear that moving their children somewhere new can negatively impact their view of stability in their lives. However, it’s an important thing to remember that children aren’t as fragile to change as we make them seem. Change is not something to fear but rather something exciting to embrace.

Introducing your children to change as they grow up teaches them valuable life-long skills. Life is constantly evolving, as adults, we have to adjust to the change that is frequently presented to us. Your children learning these skills at a young age will make their lives easier because they will know how to handle change and adjust accordingly.

Although change can be seen as a positive process, it can still be very daunting for children. It’s your job as a parent to make this move as pain-free as possible for them. Here are some steps movers in Swampscott recommend to make children less scared about the moving process:

Break the News Early

It’s important to give your children enough time to mentally prepare for a big move. Try to let them know as far in advance as possible. This will allow them to process this information and feel less overwhelmed. A good way to break the news is by gathering your family together and telling them all at once. This way your children will feel comfort in knowing that they’re not alone. When you tell your children, you must use vibrant and emotive words. Explaining the move thrillingly will get your children excited for the experience.

Have Open Discussions

After announcing the move to your children, they may have some questions or concerns. Give them the space to ask anything that’s on their mind. Answer the questions to the best of your capabilities, so that you can ease their minds. Respond to their concerns with an open mind. It’s normal to have fears about such a big change, so don’t shame them for being worried. Tell them it’s okay to feel that way and give them time to get comfortable with the idea of moving.

If your children don’t respond to this announcement, don’t despair. You can start the conversation and ask them how they’re feeling. If they’re feeling nonchalant about this news, it may be because they haven’t fully grasped the concept of them moving out of their comfort zone yet. They could also be shocked and may not be ready to talk about it. Both these scenarios are normal responses. You just have to give your children the time to adjust to change and feel comfortable expressing themselves to you.

Make it Fun

Children love fun and games. Make moving homes a fun experience for them. You can do this by turning packing into a fun game. For example, you can create a fun competition amongst your children by playing the game, “Who can pack the fastest”. Not only will you help them form a positive attitude to the move, but you’ll also trick them into helping you pack.

You can make a countdown, to build up the excitement for the big day. Make a family calendar where you can countdown the days to moving day. This will make your children see moving as something exciting to look forward to.

Familiarize Them with the Change

To help your children get comfortable with the thought of moving, familiarize them with this change. Movers in Swampscott can assist when you are moving within the town or from another town or state. Ask for information from movers such as Stairhopper Movers who have plenty of local information to share. You can also take your children to visit your new home before you move. You can hang out in the neighborhood and become familiar with your soon-to-be new home. This will make this change less daunting to your children. Change is always scarier when you don’t know what to expect.

You can also use this opportunity to introduce conversations about other types of change that may be approaching your children’s life. This move can be used to explain other forms of change to your children. You should take the time to engage in important conversations. As children grow, they’re faced with a lot of change. Your kid may be starting school soon, they may be going through puberty or they could be experiencing a loss in their lives. All these situations are difficult for children and you can use this move to help comfort your children through change.

Don’t Change Other Constants and Routines

Change exerts lots of stress on children. The moving process is very strenuous for everyone, especially your kids. The constant change surrounding them can cause high emotions and frustration in the household. As parents, you must help create a sense of routine and normality at home. This is the time to get closer as a family. Just because your children are losing their house, does not mean they’re losing their home within their family.

Participate in weekly family activities. Spend more time together and create routines. This will give your children stability and comfort, which they need during this trying time. You can increase family time through small daily routines, such as having dinner together at the dining room table, going out for walks together, and doing fun activities on the weekend. Use moving as the perfect opportunity for some family bonding.

Help Your Children Settle In

Once the moving day is over and you’re in your new home, it’s time to start helping your children settle in. Ensure that you send your children to schools that suit them best. Make friends with parents and arrange playdates and ways for your children to make new friends.

Settling in will be difficult for many kids, so make sure you’re constantly there for them. Listen to them when they want to talk and always lend a helping hand. If they have your support and comfort they’ll be just fine!

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